Chapter 17-5

Chapter 17-5 - Chapter 17 the Weaves: Basic Weaves: Plain...

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Chapter 17 – the Weaves: Basic Weaves: Plain Weave – every other row is identical, checkerboard movement, over one, one under Twill Weave – 3 rows be4 repeat row, stair step movement, design moves to the left, diagonal Satin Weave - look in book - uneven Plain Weave: least expensive to produce any type yarn, many fibers light to heavyweight fabrics balanced/unbalanced Low count Balanced Lightweight plain weaves: - cheesecloth (#22) low count soft, open weave, see through - crinoline or buckram (#113) heavily sized low-count, light weight stiff ening fabrics gauze (#23) higher count than cheesecloth (not as see through as cheese cloth) medical dressings blouses, dresses
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High count, Balanced Lightweight Plain-weave Fabric: chiffon (#17) fine, highly twisted filaments sheer evening apparel, lingerie traditionally made from silk soft -organdy (#112) Sheer 100% cotton fabric stiff ening finish (permanent, not starch, cotton painted with acid) -organza (#19) stiff , sheer fabric traditionally made from silk, manufactured filaments - voile (#18) o higher twist yarns o 2-ply warp o soft good drape-ability Fairly-high count, Opaque, Medium Weight Plain Weave Fabrics: calico (#126) closely woven small printed design Chambray (#25) Colored warp and white filing yarns Traditionally %100 cotton
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chintz (#110) large print design, largely floral glazed finish – polished cotton gingham (#24) woven check or plaid colored yarns in warp direction traditional gingham = %100 cotton, our example has polyester muslin (#108) cotton or cotton blend bleached or unbleached (unbleached = cotton greige goods) not as soft as percale percale (no swatch) closely woven, plain weave traditionally 100% cotton sheets fine carded and combed yarns hi thread count Heavy weight plain weave: Butcher linen (#26) Heavy yarn Stiff white fabric Our example is untraditional Crash (no swatch) nubby look fabric homespun (no swatch)
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irregular yarns furnishing fabrics osnaburg (no swatch) low quality cotton industrial use, curtains, upholstery Rib Variations: unbalanced weave most have crosswise ribs large # warp yarns crossing over fewer, large filling yarns, large filling yarns make ribs corded fabrics grouping yarns together in 1 direction or using single large yarns at intervals bengaline & ottoman (#31) heavyweight, large rib upholstery, furnishings broadcloth (#27) medium-weight crisp hand fine ribs cotton, cotton blends shirts, blouses poplin (#30) heavier-weight than broadcloth cotton, cotton blend - taffeta (#28) medium-weight
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traditionally made with filament yarns (sheen)
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course HUEC 2040 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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Chapter 17-5 - Chapter 17 the Weaves: Basic Weaves: Plain...

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