Todd_oblivious - Oblivious Transfer (OT) Alice (sender) has...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Oblivious Transfer (OT) Alice (sender) has n secrets Alice wants to give k secrets to Bob Bob wants the secrets but does not  want Alice to know which secrets he  has
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Oblivious Transfer  2 to 1 OT basics Use of Modular Arithmetic OT design Direct Extension of PKE OT application Secure Function Evaluation Secure Auction 
Background image of page 2
OT – Coin Toss (The basics) Alice generates 2 primes and computes their product,  p,  which is sent to Bob Bob Performs primality tests to ensure Alice is  playing fair. Bob guesses a number 0 < n < p as a factor of p Chances are he guesses wrong but Bob computes m  = n^2 mod p and sends this to Alice. Alice knows the original number, p, and she looks for  all numbers less than p that generate a remainder of  m.  This can be done fairly easily using the Chinese  Remainder Theorem
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
OT – Coin Toss Cont Alice will find at least 1 pair of such numbers, she will  then send 1 of the pairs, p ,  to Bob. O = n + p.  He will then calculate the gcd(O,p) This will yield either a trivial result or a factor of p  which Bob will send to Alice. There is a 50% chance that Alice sends the nontrivial  p to Bob. Bob has a slight advantage in that he picks the  original n, but there is a negligible chance that Bob  randomly pick an n that factors p. [Peterson]
Background image of page 4
Original OT  The transfer is somewhat like a simple game played  with a locked box requiring two different keys. A  sender transfers the locked box to a recipient, who  finds one key that partially unlocks the box. The  sender has both keys and, without seeing what the  recipient has done, must now pass on one of the two  keys. Depending on which key is sent, the recipient  will either succeed or fail in opening the box.  Although the sender's choice controls the outcome,  the sender never knows which choice to make to  guarantee a certain result. 
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Heart of OT Sender remains unsure of outcome We want more Want to share secrets not just have a fair  (50% chance) to come out with a prime  factor of a number.
Background image of page 6
Alice generates two public-key/private-key key pairs. Bob chooses a key in a symmetric encryption  algorithm (3DES, for example). He chooses one of  Alice’s public keys and encrypts his DES key with it.  He sends the encrypted key to Alice without telling  her which of her public keys he used.  Alice decrypts Bob’s key twice, once with each of her  private keys. In one of the cases, she uses the  correct key and successfully decrypts Bob’s DES key. 
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 31

Todd_oblivious - Oblivious Transfer (OT) Alice (sender) has...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online