12.08.2011 - Lecture 26 December 8, 2011 Genomes and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 26 December 8, 2011 Genomes and Genomics Pt. II (Ch. 14)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Comparative Genomics: The comparison of genome sequence and structure between closely related and distant organisms Informative in understanding gene evolution and gene function, species divergence Orthologs: related genes in different organisms; typically share similar function Paralogs: related genes (gene pairs) in the same organism; arise by gene duplication function may be different
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Comparative Genomics Phylogenetic relationships (trees, etc. .) were classically determined through comparisons of a single gene sequence among many organisms; now, entire genome sequences can be compared, allowing us to generate more accurate phylogenetic relationships
Background image of page 4
Synteny: order of genes within chromosomal region is the same as their order in the most recent common ancestor of the two species Comparative Genomics: Conserved Synteny
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Comparative Genomics of Humans: Two unrelated human genomes are 99.9% identical (differences in roughly
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 19

12.08.2011 - Lecture 26 December 8, 2011 Genomes and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online