Lecture 13

Lecture 13 - drives an inductor. We will examine the...

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Lecture 13 figures 1 Fig. 13-1: The magnetic flux density B encircles the current- carrying wire. Fig. 13-2: The magnetic flux density B in a coil of wire is strongest inside the coil, and directed along the axis of the coil. . Fig. 13-3: An inductor can be as simple as a few loops of wire, or a long coil of wire. Fig. 13-4: When we label the current through and the voltage across an inductor consistent with the passive sign convention, then v(t) = + L di(t)/dt.
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Lecture 13 figures 2 Fig. 13-5: The current will increase when a positive voltage pulse is applied. Conversely, the current will decrease when a negative voltage pulse is applied. Fig. 13-6: Determine the voltage v(t) that will increase the inductor current as shown. Fig. 13-7: Increasing the current in the inductor increases the energy stored in the B field.
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Lecture 13 figures 3 Fig. 13-8: A sinusoidal current
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Unformatted text preview: drives an inductor. We will examine the voltage v L (t), the power absorbed by the inductor, p L (t), and the stored energy W L (t). Lecture 13 figures 4 Fig. 13-10: The current i(t) and voltage v(t) are labeled in accordance with the passive sign convention. Fig. 13-9: Symbol for a capacitor. Fig. 13-11: Diagram of a parallel plate capacitor. A is the area of each plate, d is the spacing, and is the permittivity of the dielectric material in the space between the plates. Fig. 13-12: The current i(t) flows onto a capacitor of C = 20 F. Determine the capacitor voltage v(t). Let v(0) = 0 V. Fig. 13-13: For the previous example (Fig. 16-4), determine the power absorbed and the energy stored by the capacitor. Lecture 13 figures 5 Fig. 13-14: A sinusoidal source charges a capacitor C. Determine i(t), p c (t), and W c (t)....
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Lecture 13 - drives an inductor. We will examine the...

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