Chapter 2 Summary

Chapter 2 Summary - Chapter 2 Properties of Materials 1.

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Chapter 2 Properties of Materials 1. Structure-Property-Processing-Performance Relationships Success on many engineering activities depends on the selection of engineering materials whose properties match the requirements of the application Properties and performance of a material are a direct results of its structure and processing The many possible combinations of protons, neutrons, and electrons allows many different materials to exist 2. Physical properties: A property that dictates how a material responds to a physical signal/load (such as heat, light, voltage, magnetic field, gravity…) Density, melting point, optical properties, thermal properties, electrical properties, magnetic properties Mechanical properties: A property that dictates how a material responds to applied loads and forces Determined through specified testing 3. Stress and strain Strain is the distortion or deformation of a material from a force or a load Stress is the force or the load being transmitted through the material’s cross sectional area Stress and strain can occur as tensile, compressive or shear 4. Static Properties Constant force on a material is called a static force Compression test Tensile test Engineering Stress-Strain Curve (for tensile and compressive tests) True stress and strain curve Proportional limit, Young’s Modulus, Ultimate Strength Modulus of resilience- amount of energy per unit volume that a material can absorb Plastic deformation- permanent change in shape due to a load that exceeded the yield point Yield point - stress value where plastic deformation starts, or additional strain occurs without an increase in stress. Necking is a localized reduction in cross sectional area For ductile materials, necking occurs before fracture For brittle materials, fracture ends the stress strain curve before necking Percent elongation is the percent change of a material at fracture 5. True Stress and strain curve
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Chapter 2 Summary - Chapter 2 Properties of Materials 1.

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