part_5_CEBus2 - CEBus R Newman University of Florida What...

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CEBus R. Newman University of Florida
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What is CEBus Consumer Electronics Bus (See-bus) Electronic Industries Association (EIA) Standard for Physical interface for devices in the home to exchange information (TPBus, CXBus, PLBus, …) Common language for them to “talk” (CAL) Three aims: Universal, low-cost, generic communication method for in-home devices Reliable distribution of access services in the home Reliable distribution of wide-band services within the home (e.g., DVR to TV, home theater, etc.) Multiple media: TP, Coax (2 cables), PL, RF, IR
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CEBus History Pre-1984 – X10, GE’s Homenet existing PLC methods 1984 – EIA starts standards process IS60 1985 – field tests for PLC 1986 – GE provides Homenet as a basis for CEBus (GE used X10 for their HomeMinder products), PLC 120 KHz 1Kbps ASK, CEBus named 1989 – demos at winter CES, ASK PLBus ballot 1991 – Intellon’s 10Kpbs spread spectrum PHY replaces ASK due to X10 incompatibility (“all lights on”) 1992 - FCC part 15 rule amended for PLC, EIA releases Interim Standard (IS60) 1994 – Standard revised 1995 – IS 60 becomes ANSI/EIA standard EIA 600
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CEBus Standards Physical Layer/media IS-60.03/EIA-600.3x 9 Parts: PL (1), TP (2), CX (3), IR (4) RF (5), FO (6), TP/CX/IR symbols (7), PL/RF symbols (8), ‘Node 0’ PHY NW support fcns (9) Node Comm’s Protocol IS-60.04/EIA-600.4x Part 1 Data Link, Part 2 MAC, Part 3 LL, Part 4 Network Layer Description, Part 5 Network Layer, Part 6 Application Layer Router Comm Protocol IS-60.05/EIA-600.5x 4 parts describing router function Brouter Comm Protocol IS-60.06/EIA-600.6x 4 parts describing brouter (wired/non-wired) function Supplemental Data IS-60.07/EIA-600.7x For future – not used Common Application Language (CAL) IS60.08/EIA-600.8x Part 1 CAL, Part 2 CAL Contexts (universal, data channel, tune, user interface) Separate docs for context data structures Lighting, audio/video, security, HVAC
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CEBus Physical Layer/media PL (part 1) – 110/220 V. power lines Use existing wiring, any AC powered device TP (part 2) – four twisted pairs Low DC voltage devices – thermostats, sensors In place of or supplemental to phone wiring CEBus distributes 18 V. to devices on TP0 CX (part 3) – two coax cables For ‘cabled’ devices like TV, VCR, DVR, etc. One for in-home sources One for external (access) sources IR (part 4) 915 MHz center, for “throughout home” wireless RF (part 5) Line of sight (in-room) wireless – similar to remote controls FO (part 6) – fiber optics part not completed (interest?)
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CEBus Node Communications Protocol (Volume 4) Follows ISO OSI reference architecture Data Link Layer with 2 sub-layers MAC – packet delivery, error handling, addressing, packet time, buffering
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