Narrative_Analysis

Narrative_Analysis - Narrative Analysis Explanation and Study Guide Introduction to the New Testament Narrative Analysis On Reading A central

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Narrative Analysis -- Explanation and Study Guide Introduction to the New Testament Narrative Analysis On Reading A central premise of this course is that reading the New Testament is like reading any other literature. Thus as we enter upon the work of the course it will be profitable to think a bit about what’s involved in reading. So what’s involved in reading a text? According to the RANDOM HOUSE DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE readers do not sit passively before a text soaking it up. Reading involves more than merely scanning your eyes over a page of text. Merely decoding the words is not yet reading. Reading involves work! The dictionary definition is emphatic about it. Reading involves the work of trying to understand by apprehending, interpreting, making out the significance, anticipating, foreseeing, foretelling, and drawing inferences. In the final analysis, according to the dictionary, reading is summed up as an act in which readers, to serve a wide variety of interests, occupy themselves seriously with the study of the text before them. Part of the reason that reading involves work is because the text is just words on the page. They have no voice unless we give them voice. Furthermore the text has no one to stand up and guard the integrity of what has been written but readers. Readers, however, do not come to the text with a blank slate. Our ideas of what a text is about come, actually, from two sources: 1) the text, of course, but also 2) from the knowledge—namely, the hunches, convictions, presuppositions, sense of reality, and so forth—that is rattling around in our minds as we read. Thus as we read the NT we continually seek to maintain clarity about where our ideas come from. As well, we seek to discover the extent to which the background knowledge which we bring to reading a text represents a vested interest, and the extent to which our vested interests inform and shape our reading of the NT materials. In addition to the letters of the NT the second major division of materials is narratives— Matthew, Mark, John, and Luke-Acts. It is to this material that we now turn our attention, seeking to cultivate respectful and fruitful ways of engaging the material. I. What is Narrative Analysis? Narrative Analysis is a critical technique designed to foster reader familiarity with a
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course RELI 120 taught by Professor Thompson during the Spring '08 term at Gonzaga.

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Narrative_Analysis - Narrative Analysis Explanation and Study Guide Introduction to the New Testament Narrative Analysis On Reading A central

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