EGM_6812_Exam_1_2003

EGM_6812_Exam_1_2003 - EGN 6812 - Fluid Mechanics I Fall...

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EGN 6812 - Fluid Mechanics I – Fall 2003 10/23/03, Mid Term Exam Name: ________________ 1/11 Questions: (40 points total, 4 points each) 1. ( ) ij j x i u τ is the surface work term due to viscous forces in the energy equation. Mathematically decompose this term into components that increase/decrease kinetic and internal energy. Clearly label your terms and explain your answer in terms of forces, velocities, and deformations. 2. Provide a physical explanation of Stokes’ hypothesis ( i.e., not an equation) and describe when it is and is not valid. 3. From a molecular force perspective, what is the fundamental difference between a liquid and a gas? 4. Explain the difference between a Lagrangian and a Eulerian method of description.
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EGN 6812 - Fluid Mechanics I – Fall 2003 10/23/03, Mid Term Exam Name: ________________ 2/11 Questions continued: (40 points total, 4 points each) 5. Using scaling analysis mathematically show the physical meaning of the Reynolds number based on typical terms in the Navier Stokes Equations for incompressible flow and constant viscosity. 6. At a planar air/water interface, what are the appropriate boundary conditions for the continuity and momentum equations for incompressible flow? What approximation can be made. 7. The coefficient of viscosity is strictly a function of pressure and temperature. What is the
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EGM_6812_Exam_1_2003 - EGN 6812 - Fluid Mechanics I Fall...

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