Lecture_02_092911 - Lecture 2: Measurements and Scientific...

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Lecture 2: Measurements and Scientific Notation • Goals: Be familiar with the base units and abbreviations for the metric system, write numbers using scientific notation and be able to use prefixes to change base units to larger or smaller units • Outline (Timberlake Chapter 1.1-1.2, 1.5) : ± Units of Measurement (1.1) ± Scientific Notation (1.2) ± Prefixes and Equalities (1.5) • Problems for Extra Practice: 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.7, 1.9, 1.35, 1.37, 1.39, 1.41
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Units Listed on Labels
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Stating a Measurement In every measurement, a number is followed by a unit . Observe the following examples of measurements: Number and Unit 35 m 0.25 L 225 lb
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The SI System Scientists recognized that a standard system of units was needed if measurements were to be useful Two major systems English Metric In 1960, an international agreement set up a system of units called the International System (SI) Based on the metric system and units derived from the metric system related decimal systems based on 10
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Measurements - Length Length – Uses the unit meter (m) in both the SI and metric systems 1 meter = 39.4 inches – Measured with a meter stick – centimeter (cm) is a smaller unit of length 1 inch = 2.54 cm – A dime is 1 mm thick. – A quarter is 2.5 cm in diameter. – The average height of an adult male is 1.8 m.
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Measurements - Volume Volume – amount of space a substance occupies – uses the unit liter (L) in the metric system 1 L = 1.06 qt – uses the unit cubic meter (m 3 ) in the SI system – is measured using a graduated cylinder – milliliter (mL) more convenient for measuring smaller quantities – A 12 oz can of soda has a volume of about 360 mL.
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This note was uploaded on 01/18/2012 for the course CHEM 120A taught by Professor Leahmiller during the Fall '11 term at University of Washington.

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Lecture_02_092911 - Lecture 2: Measurements and Scientific...

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