Lecture_22_110811 - Lecture 22: Gas Laws Goals: Examine the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 22: Gas Laws Goals: Examine the relationship between temperature and volume and between temperature and pressure. Use the combined gas law to find the new pressure, volume or temperature when changes in two of these properties are given. Outline (Timberlake 7.4-7.7): ± Temperature and Volume (7.4) ± Temperature and Pressure (7.5) ± The Combined Gas Law (7.6) ± Volume and Moles (7.7) Problems for Extra Practice: 7.23, 7.25, 7.27, 7.31, 7.33, 7.35, 7.37, 7.39, 7.41, 7.45, 7.47, 7.49
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Properties of Gases • Gases are described in terms of four properties: pressure ( P ), volume ( V ), temperature ( T ), and amount ( n ).
Background image of page 2
Boyle’s Law Boyle’s law states that • the pressure of a gas is inversely related to its volume when T and n are constant • if the pressure ( P ) increases, then the volume ( V ) decreases P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Charles’s Law In Charles’s law , • the Kelvin temperature of a gas is directly related to the volume P and n are constant • when the temperature of a gas increases, its volume increases
Background image of page 4
• For two conditions, Charles’s law is written V 1 = V 2 ( P and n constant) T 1 T 2 • Rearranging Charles’s law to solve for V 2 gives T 2 x V 1 = V 2 x T 2 T 1 T 2 V 2 = V 1 x T 2 T 1 Charles’s Law: V and T
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Learning Check Solve Charles’s law expression for T 2 . V 1 = V 2 T 1 T 2
Background image of page 6
temperature drops to 0 °C, what is the new volume of the balloon ( P constant)? Calculations Using Charles’s Law
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/18/2012 for the course CHEM 120A taught by Professor Leahmiller during the Fall '11 term at University of Washington.

Page1 / 33

Lecture_22_110811 - Lecture 22: Gas Laws Goals: Examine the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online