2009-09-23_-_Lecture_9

2009-09-23_-_Lecture_9 - Biochemistry 461 FS 2009 Michigan...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Biochemistry 461 FS 2009 Michigan State University Enzyme Catalysis and Mechanism September 23, 2009 Lecture 9 • 1926 – urease crystallized • Composed entirely of proteins • Urease crystals could perform the reaction (in solution) • Therefore enzymes are proteins! • Usually true • We now know that some nucleic acids can also be enzymes (discussed later in the book – we will only deal with proteins). • Some key properties of enzymes are: • Enzymes are catalysts (we’ll discuss what this means shortly) • Large rate accelerations • Mild reaction conditions • Physiological pH, temperature, pressure, etc. • High reaction specificity • Capacity for regulation What are Enzymes? 2
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
• Many enzymes require non-protein components ( cofactors ) for activity ¾ Metal ions ¾ Coenzymes , small organic or metalloorganic molecules (many coenzymes are derived from vitamins) • A cofactor that is very tightly (or even covalently) bound is called a prosthetic groups • Holoenzyme vs. apoenzyme What are Enzymes? • A species that is required for
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 5

2009-09-23_-_Lecture_9 - Biochemistry 461 FS 2009 Michigan...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online