MIT6_042JF10_mid_pctce_sol

MIT6_042JF10_mid_pctce_sol - 6.042/18.062J Mathematics for...

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Unformatted text preview: 6.042/18.062J Mathematics for Computer Science October 21, 2010 Tom Leighton, Marten van Dijk, and Brooke Cowan Midterm Practice Problems Problem 1. [10 points] In problem set 1 you showed that the nand operator by itself can be used to write equivalent expressions for all other Boolean logical operators. We call such an operator universal . Another universal operator is nor , defined such that P nor Q ( P Q ). Show how to express P Q in terms of: nor , P , Q , and grouping parentheses. Solution. ( P ) nor ( Q ) = ( P nor P ) nor ( Q nor Q ). Problem 2. [15 points] We define the sequence of numbers 1 if 0 n 3, a n = a n 1 + a n 2 + a n 3 + a n 4 if n 4. Prove that a n 1 (mod 3) for all n 0. Solution. Proof by strong induction. Let P ( n ) be the predicate that a n 1 (mod 3). Base case: For n 3, a n = 1 and is therefore 1 (mod 3). Inductive step: For n 4, assume P ( k ) for k n in order to prove P ( n + 1). In particular, since each of a n 4 , a n 3 , a n 2 and a n 1 is 1 (mod 3), their sum must be 4 1 (mod 3). Therefore, a n 1 (mod 3) and P ( n + 1) holds. Problem 3. [20 points] The Slipped Disc Puzzle consists of a track holding 9 circular tiles. In the middle is a disc that can slide left and right and rotate 180 to change the positions of exactly four tiles. As shown below, there are three ways to manipulate the puzzle: Shift Right: The center disc is moved one unit to the right (if there is space) Rotate Disc: The four tiles in the center disc are reversed Shift Left: The center disc is moved one unit to the left (if there is space) 2 Midterm Practice Problems s h if t r ig h t rotate disc s h if t le f t 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 6 5 4 3 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Prove that if the puzzle starts in an initial state with all but tiles 1 and 2 in their natural order, then it is impossible to reach a goal state where all the tiles are in their natural order....
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course CS 6.042J / 1 taught by Professor Tomleighton,dr.martenvandijk during the Fall '10 term at MIT.

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MIT6_042JF10_mid_pctce_sol - 6.042/18.062J Mathematics for...

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