child_abuse

child_abuse - Chapter 14 Child Abuse and Neglect...

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Chapter 14 Child Abuse and Neglect
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Terminology Risk factor - A characteristic of a situation or person that makes a certain negative outcome MORE likely. Without this particular trait, the individual’s risk for the outcome is decreased . Protective factor - A characteristic of a situation or person that makes a certain negative outcome LESS likely. Without this particular trait, the individual’s risk for the outcome is increased . Lifetime prevalence - At some point in the individual’s life, he or she exhibits the outcome of interest.
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Healthy Child-Rearing and Families Children need a balance of control and responsiveness Healthy parenting includes knowledge of child development and expectations, adequate coping skills, healthy parent- child attachment and communication, home management skills, shared parental responsibilities, and provision of social services
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Child-Rearing and Maltreatment Maltreatment represents major failures of the child’s expectable environment for infants, an expectable environment includes protective and nurturing adults, and opportunities for socialization older children require a supportive family, contact with peers, and plenty of opportunities to explore and master the environment
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Classification of Maltreatment Boundaries between appropriate and inappropriate child rearing are not always clear or well-established, and may vary according to cultural values, community standards, and personal experiences Example: what is an appropriate medical intervention? Medications versus cupping/coining for flu Or, when disciplining a child, how much physical contact is okay? In our culture, none; but in other cultures, lots.
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Classification of Maltreatment For DSM-IV, maltreatment could be noted on Axis I (“Other conditions that may be the focus of clinical attention”) or Axis IV (psychosocial and environmental problems) Important to note, however, that abusing a child does not automatically qualify the abuser for any diagnostic label. There is no ‘child abuser’ disorder. In fact, we are more likely to consider the child/victim the ‘sick’ one.
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Types of Maltreatment Physical abuse: A non-accidental injury to a child by a parent or caretaker. Examples: physically harmful acts including punching, beating, kicking,biting, burning, shaking. Telltale signs: Frequent bruises especially on face, neck, forearms. The child may be overly afraid of the parent’s reaction to misbehavior.
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Types of Maltreatment Neglect: failure to provide for a child’s basic physical, educational, or emotional needs. The child does not receive food, appropriate clothing, hygenic care, medical care, supervision. Telltale signs:
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child_abuse - Chapter 14 Child Abuse and Neglect...

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