ConitionandLanguage%20handout-2 - 1 2 3 Language and...

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9/15/2011 1 Language and Cognition Student Outcomes The student will be able to: 1) demonstrate an understanding of cognition as it relates to language acquisition 2) apply 3 central concepts and 3 central behaviors of the sensorimotor stage to language acquisition. 3) analyze the contributions of Piaget and Vygotsky to language acquisition. Roots in Psychology Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky are 2 developmental psychologists who have had a significant impact on our view concerning the relationship between cognition and language. Jean Piaget was a Swiss Psychologist. He developed stages of cognitive development that have an impact on how we view children’s cognitive development. Lev Vygotsky was a Russian psychologist who died of TB in 1934. One of his works that is seminal for language learning was “Thought and Language.” Piaget’s Theory Piaget concluded that cognitive development is the result of biological maturation in interaction with the environment. According to Piaget, four basic concepts underlie cognitive organization: schema, assimilation, accommodation, and equilibrium. Schema can be understood as a concept, mental category, or cognitive structure. Assimilation is the cognitive process whereby a person includes a new stimulus into an existing schema. Accommodation involves the development of new schemata to allow of the organization of stimuli that do not fit into existing schemata. Equilibrium is the balance between the processes of assimilation and accommodation. Piaget’s 4 Stages of Cognitive Development Sensorimotor--0-2 years reflexive to proactive behavior Ability to represent reality (symbolic function) to invent novel means to desired ends without trial-and-error methodology, to imitate when model not immediately present and to represent absent people and objects. 1. Preoperational Thought 2-7 Years Further development of symbolic function: language, physical problem solving, categorization.
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