22probation_parole_talk - Probation / Parole By Honorable...

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Probation / Parole By Honorable Kathleen McGuire, Judge, Merrimack County Superior Court Probation and parole are two forms of community supervision of convicted criminal offenders. Probation is technically defined as a period of supervision instead of confinement. In New Hampshire, probation is also used following a misdemeanor sentence of confinement at a county jail. Parole is technically defined as a period of supervised release, following a felony sentence served in a prison. The conditions for probation and parole are identical. The same officers supervise in either case and all probation/parole officers have mixed caseloads of convicted offenders on probation and parole. The only significant differences between the two statuses of probation and parole are how an offender gets on probation or parole and how they get violated. Probation involves the courts in both instances and parole involves the parole board in both instances. In 2002, approximately 6.7 million people – that is 1 in every 32 adults, or 3.1% of the population – were in the American corrections system; either incarcerated, on probation, or on parole. Of those 6.7 million people, about 2 million were incarcerated in prisons or jails and about 4.7 million were on probation or parole. That is, almost three quarters of Americans in the corrections system are on probation or parole. So probation and parole supervision of criminal offenders in 1
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the community is a huge and critical part of our corrections systems. I will refer to both probation and parole as community supervision. It is impossible to incarcerate all criminal offenders; keeping someone in prison is very expensive – it costs approximately $22,000 a year – and prisons are already filled beyond capacity. Also, we simply don’t need to incarcerate everyone. And we must bear in mind that even of those incarcerated, almost all will return to society. We must prepare them for that return. What are the goals of community supervision? 1. Protect public safety 2. Hold criminal offenders accountable to victims and the community and repair the damage they have done by: a. having offenders pay restitution and fines b. or having offenders perform community service. 3. Ensure offenders get drug and alcohol treatment and any other mental health counseling necessary to overcome problems, which contributed to the offender committing crime. How are these goals accomplished? An offender released to the community on probation or parole is subject to conditions. There are standard conditions that apply to everyone. Additionally, 2
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each offender is evaluated and subject to special conditions that fit his or her individual needs or problems. All of these conditions form a contract between the
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This note was uploaded on 01/18/2012 for the course DEP 235 taught by Professor Eeer during the Spring '11 term at Assoc. of Chartered Certified Accountants.

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22probation_parole_talk - Probation / Parole By Honorable...

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