CHAPTER_3-draft for - CHAPTER 3 METHODOLOGY Introduction This chapter highlights the research methodology and procedures used in the study This

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Unformatted text preview: CHAPTER 3. METHODOLOGY Introduction This chapter highlights the research methodology and procedures used in the study. This includes the research design, hypothesis, population and sample, responses, instrumentation, data collection and procedure, data analysis, and ethical consideration. Research Design This research will investigate EI, perceived job burnout, and job insecurity. These variables will be evaluated using a theory-testing design. Robson (1993) identified a theory- testing design as a traditional research strategy. This research strategy involves determining the research questions, determining participants, selecting methods, selecting analysis tools, and interpreting results (Cooper & Schindler, 2003; Robson, 1993). The coverage of the design must be adapted to the study’s purpose (Cooper & Schindler, 2003). The research design for this study involves collecting data on two or more preexisting variables and will describe the relationships that exist between the variables. Each element of the research design is further elaborated throughout the chapter. Additionally, Robson pointed out that a research strategy requires a plan by which the strategy is to be carried out. This research study will use a quantitative survey approach. Information will be obtained through an established questionnaire that will be administered to all employees in the organization. Analysis will use appropriate statistical techniques to test the hypotheses and graphs and pie charts to depict the results. This research study was guided by the correlational inquiry approach. Correlational research refers to the investigation of one or more characteristics of a group to discover the extent to which the characteristics vary together (Creswell, 2005). Since this study aim to 1) understand the perceptions and experiences of public child welfare worker from their own point of view, and 2) display the relationships among variables, including emotional intelligence, job burnout, and job insecurity, correlational analysis was ideal guiding framework. Correlational analysis examines the differences between groups in antecedents, behaviors, or experiences such as those related to an individual’s emotional health. The major advantage of a correlational research design is that one can make a prediction about a phenomenon when one knows the correlation (negative or positive) between two variables. For example, the prediction can be made that high EI levels and job insecurity will be positively correlated. Thus, management can predict that workers with high EI levels will experience job insecurity when workers display negative emotions at work such as avoidance, distancing, resentment, dissatisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and hopelessness toward their jobs. Understanding the relationships between emotions and motivations is important to identify potential areas for greater success in supervisor–employee relationships....
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This note was uploaded on 01/18/2012 for the course DEP 235 taught by Professor Eeer during the Spring '11 term at Assoc. of Chartered Certified Accountants.

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CHAPTER_3-draft for - CHAPTER 3 METHODOLOGY Introduction This chapter highlights the research methodology and procedures used in the study This

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