Sex_in_your_tongue_Sexual_Rights_from_a.pdf - conference...

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conference papers
Geetanjali Misra looking in, looking out: starting the count | 8 Srilatha Batliwala unpacking social exclusion: a primer for marginalised women | 17 Kyla Pasha ‘other’ women in pakistan’s women’s movement | 37 Firdous Azim sexuality and the women’s movement in bangladesh | 47 Bishakha Datta steel knife in my windpipe: what violence against sex workers looks like from the inside | 55 Geetanjali Misra sex work advocacy in india: the rise of a movement | 66 Ponni Arasu queer women in south asia: an analysis | 76 Anita Ghai (dis)ability and exclusion: an analysis | 90 Shilpa Phadke rethinking spatial binaries : a view from the gendered double margins | 100 Kaushalya Perrera sex in your tongue: sexual rights from a language perspective | 109 Shohini Ghosh the public and private life of cinema and censorship | 118
conference papers* Part of being socially excluded involves being steadily invisibilised: your issues rarely find public voice, your voices rarely reach public platforms, and your rights are eroded in public spaces. CREA’s commitment to inclusive communities necessitates putting an end to this process of invisibility – to publicly articulating that which so rarely is. As part of the Count Me In! Conference, CREA has commissioned leading South Asian scholars, activists and writers to write; to address issues of marginalisation and exclusion as concepts, and how these issues impact the lives of sex workers, lesbians, disabled women and trans people. The resulting papers serve as an academic resource, as a point of departure for discussions on social exclusion, and as a beginning. Start reading, commit to understanding, and to counting people in. Geetanjali Misra looking in, looking out: starting the count Count Me In. Each of the three words is loaded with myriad meanings: of numbers, of definitions, of movements and communities that include and exclude. Included is upper- caste, heterosexual, married, able-bodied, upper-class; excluded is everything else. Important is violence against the included; ignored is violence against everyone else. So how then do we negotiate new realities? How do we transgress existing norms to redefine what matters, and who counts? We might start with the definitions: who is a woman, what is violence, how do the two intersect. We might look for structures, hierarchies, and underlying histories of privilege. In this paper, I engage with ‘permissable’ and ‘non- permissable’ sexualities, identities, and experiences of violence to interrogate accepted wisdoms, contest dominant narratives – and to advocate for human rights that are indeed for all. Srilatha Batliwala unpacking social exclusion: a primer for marginalised women The concept of social exclusion is both the most advanced and multi-dimensional framework for deconstructing social injustice. The social exclusion framework builds * These papers have been written and compiled for CREA’s Count Me In! Conference 2011. These are draft papers and should be read as works in progress. Please do not reprint, cite and/or disseminate. CREA will be publishing an edited volume of the final papers shortly.
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