vacuum_methods

vacuum_methods - Experiments in Modern Physics Introductory...

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Experiments in Modern Physics Introductory Lab: Vacuum Methods Rex Tayloe Department of Physics, Indiana University 1/14/03 (Original by HOM 5/14/98) Last Revised: 9/3/03 Goal Get acquainted with the components of a high-vacuum system. Introduction In this lab you will become familiar with the various components of the lab vacuum system and see how good of a vacuum (low pressure) you can achieve. There are many books that contain all necessary information. One of the best is the classic by Roth [1], which is available at the experimental station. The International System of Units has never become popular among vacuum practitioners. Thus, we shall keep using here the familiar, non-S.I. units (for conversion factors between different units, see [1], p.42 and p.65). Unless otherwise indicated, we will use l (liters = 10 -3 m 3 ) for volume , and Torr (= 133.3 N/m 2 (Pascal)) for pressure. An amount of gas, M, is given by M=pV (units: Torr liters). The gas flow Q measures an amount of gas per time t, Q=M/t (units: Torr l/s). Gas flow from point A to point B is
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vacuum_methods - Experiments in Modern Physics Introductory...

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