5B - 5B: ACOUSTIC RESONANCES A. INTRODUCTION: Often a...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
P108 Lab 5B&1 5B: A COUSTIC R ESONANCES A. I NTRODUCTION : Often a system has natural frequencies of vibration. In the case of the column of air in the PVC tube we are studying, these natural frequencies are called the harmonic frequencies, f 1 , f 2 ,&. A vibrating source, such as the speaker, is said to drive the column of air. As the frequency, f , of the driver (speaker) is slowly varied, the amplitude of the driven system (air column) gets larger and larger until it reaches a peak at one of its own resonant frequencies, f 1 , f 2 ,&. Therefore, as we sweep the speaker frequency past one of the harmonic frequencies of the air column, we hear the increase in amplitude of the vibrating air column as an increase in loudness of the radiated sound from the tube. At resonance the driving system passes energy very efficiently on to the driven system and the amplitude of the driven system reaches a maximum called A max . (See Rossing, The Science of Sound, Ch. 4.) A graph of the amplitude as a function of frequency is shown here. Output signal voltage background level maximum signal A max =resonant amplitude 0.71 A max D f =linewidth f =frequency f 1 Note that the resonant amplitude peaks at frequency f 1 and that the peak has a width, D f called the linewidth. The linewidth is usually measured at an amplitude of 71% of A max . For a system which loses energy rapidly through damping or friction, the maximum amplitude, A max , is small and the linewidth large, and the resonance is said to be broad . Similarly, for a resonating system which loses energy very slowly, the maximum amplitude is very large and the linewidth is very small. The resonance is said to be sharp.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
P108 Lab 5B&2 The quality, Q , characterizes the sharpness of one of the resonances. For example, for the fundamental frequency the Q value is: Q f f = 1 D . (1.0) A high Q circuit is one with a sharp resonance. Once set oscillating it loses energy very slowly. A tuning fork is an example of an object with a very high Q . To drive an object with high Q , the driving frequency must be very close to the resonant frequency, f 1 .
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 8

5B - 5B: ACOUSTIC RESONANCES A. INTRODUCTION: Often a...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online