hume notes-jing

hume notes-jing - What objections to the social contract...

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What objections to the social contract theory does Hume raise? Hume raises four main arguments against the Social Contract Theory. His four arguments include that there is no historical contract that can be traced that established a legitimacy of government. He also says that people's acquiescence does not necessarily give their tacit consent and legitimize government. The third objection is that he says that government is established through a promise made by people prior to government. People are only bound to obey and oblige by the government by only a promise , which is conditional on the justice and protection from the sovereign after government is established. His last objection is that people accept the government, but they are not authorizing government with their consent because people think government already has authority. Who do his objections apply to and are they valid objections? Hume's objections apply to the previous philosophers we have studied, Locke, Hobbes, and Rousseau. Most of his objections apply to Locke, some to Hobbes, and a few to Rousseau. His first argument that there is no historical contract that can be traced is most valid to Locke and Hobbes. Both Locke and Hobbes base their social contract theory off of a social contract that occurred and bound the people to the laws. His theory against tacit consent legitimizing government is also aimed at Locke mostly. Locke's idea of tacit consent binds people to follow
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hume notes-jing - What objections to the social contract...

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