Notes+11+Fall+2004

Notes+11+Fall+2004 - Notes 11 Fall 2004.doc Polarization...

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Notes 11 Fall 2004.doc Polarization According to the IEEE Standard Definitions for antennas the polarization of a radiated wave is defined as “That property of a radiated electromagnetic wave describing the time-varying direction and relative magnitude of the electric field vector; specifically, the figure traced as a function of time by the extremity of the vector at a fixed location in space, and the sense in which it is traced, as observed along the direction of propagation.” We showed before for the field represented in free space by ( )( z k t cos E x ˆ t , z 0 0 x ω ) = E G that at a particular choice of z the electric field vector varies in a straight line. Therefore, we can say that this electric field is a linearly polarized uniform plane wave. In phasor form this field is . z jk 0 x s 0 e E x ˆ E = G We can write a more general phasor form which will encompass two additional polarization types: () ( b 0 a 0 z k j z k j s be y ˆ ae x ˆ E φ + ± φ + ± + = ) G where a and b are the amplitudes for each direction and a φ , b φ
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course EE 4460 taught by Professor Czarnecki during the Fall '10 term at LSU.

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Notes+11+Fall+2004 - Notes 11 Fall 2004.doc Polarization...

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