{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chapter_11 - Chapter 11 Designing Hybrid Materials...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 Designing Hybrid Materials Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 4th Edition © 2010 Michael Ashby
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hybrid materials combine the properties of two (or more) monolithic materials or of one material and space. They include fibrous and particulate composites, foams and lattices, sandwiches, and almost all natural materials Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 4th Edition © 2010 Michael Ashby Figure 11.1
Image of page 2
Four configurations for a bridge. The design variables describing the performance of each differ. Optimization of performance becomes possible only when a configuration has been chosen. Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 4th Edition © 2010 Michael Ashby Figure 11.2
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
All material property charts examined thus far have been populated with holes. One approach to filling these holes is by developing hybrid materials that have the desired property profile Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 4th Edition © 2010 Michael Ashby Figure 11.3 Figure 11.3 shows holes in modulus-density space. Material development that extended the occupied territory in the direction of the arrow allows components with greater stiffness to weight than any current material allows
Image of page 4
The possibilities of hybridization. The properties of the hybrid reflect those of its component materials, combined in one of several ways. Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 4th Edition © 2010 Michael Ashby Figure 11.4
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Steps in designing a hybrid to meet given design requirements Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 4th Edition © 2010 Michael Ashby Figure 11.5
Image of page 6
Four Types of Composites Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 4th Edition © 2010 Michael Ashby Figure 11.6
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Properties of Composites Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, 4th Edition © 2010 Michael Ashby Density Modulus ρ m – density of matrix ρ r – density of reinforcement f – volume fraction of reincforcement Upper Bound Lower Bound E r – Young’s modulus of reinforcement E m – Young’s modulus of matrix f – volume fraction of reinforcement
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern