4 Ideologies of Influence

4 Ideologies of Influence - Ideologies of Influence...

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Ideologies of Influence – Optimism and Pessimism
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Schedule 1. Technology as a Symbol 2. Ideologies of Influence 3. Technological Optimism - Technophiles 4. Technological Pessimism – Technophobes 5. Dialectics of Technology 6. Dialogue 7. Ideology in practice (the “unabomber”) 8. Questioning “progress” 9. The Future is not inevitable
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Symbol
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Dialectical Symbol
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Ideology A set of attitudes, beliefs, assumptions and perceptions about the actual world in which we live. may or may not have a factual basis may or may be proven true or false. make sense of themselves and the world in which they live. a way to make meaningful, purposeful and coherent what may otherwise be an absolutely meaningless, purposeless and chaotic world. What goes without saying
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Technological Optimism Technophiles Technology = Progress Technology has made our present-day society better than those of the past and will progress us toward a future that is better than today. The end-point of our progress is a “good life” (individual and collective material betterment [a life that is more abundant, comfortable, easy, convenient] and individual and collective moral betterment [a society that is more humane, rational, just, enlightened, democratic and tolerant]. 18 th century Enlightenment (Francis Bacon, Immanuel Kant, etc.) Utopianism U.S. culture
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Painting Technological Optimism: Christian Schussele, “Men of Progress” (1863) Benjamin Franklin Samuel Colt Charles Goodyear Samuel Morse Elias Howe
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Painting Technological Optimism: John Gast, “American Progress” (1872)
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New York’s ‘World of Tomorrow’ (1939) Fair slogan: “Dawn of a New Day”
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New York’s ‘World of Tomorrow’ (1939) From a Fair pamphlet: “The eyes of the Fair are on the future—not in the sense of peering toward the unknown nor attempting to foretell the events of tomorrow and the shape of things to come, but in the sense of presenting a new and clearer view of today in preparation for tomorrow; a view of the forces and ideas that prevail as well as the machines. To its visitors, the Fair will say: ‘Here are the materials, ideas and forces at work in our world. These are the tools with which the world of Tomorrow must be made. They are all interesting and much effort has been expended to lay them before you in an interesting way. Familiarity with today is the best preparation for the future.” (WWII began soon after)
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This note was uploaded on 01/18/2012 for the course POLITICS POL 507 taught by Professor Mirlees during the Fall '11 term at Ryerson.

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4 Ideologies of Influence - Ideologies of Influence...

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