Brazilian taught about the meaning of some obscure Portuguese word with a grain of salt

Brazilian taught about the meaning of some obscure Portuguese word with a grain of salt

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o Brazilian taught about the meaning of some obscure Portuguese word with a grain of salt. If the said Brazilian insists that some string of words is a very polite way to introduce yourself to strangers, take note; actually is a very offensive curse idiom. Maybe this trope born in an old routine in a famous TV show, A praça é nossa , where a poor German (played by Jô Soares), with a poor grasp of the Portuguese, are made the butt of the joke. Kelly Key, a Brazilian pop singer, has admitted doing the same with her north American manager, on the talk show of the same Jô Soares. Names: One of the main things about Brazil is that many people have informal nicknames. For example, former president Luiz Inácio da Silva is generally just "Lula"; even the press will call him just "Presidente Lula" (he actually had it legally incorporated into his name), and his successor Dilma Rousseff is just "Dilma". Also, Brazilian names tend to go to three or more words, because as rule of thumb both parents pass their last names forward with the child, not only the father - and the mother can register only in her name too. o Calling people by surnames is almost never an indicative of being formal or polite. Most often, this happens because there are more people who go by the same given name and surnames are used as surrogate names to avoid ambiguity when a nickname can't be earned. o But some of these, like "da Silva" and "de Oliveira", or are composed surnames, directly correlate to German "von" and Dutch "van"/"van der" as in "von Braun" or "van Helsing". Unlike these counterparts, they're stipped when out of context:
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Brazilian taught about the meaning of some obscure Portuguese word with a grain of salt

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