Lecture 14 - :Sovereignty,Diplomacy AndInternationalLaw...

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International Society: Sovereignty, Diplomacy And International Law 00:40 I. International Society a. English School and “Grotian Model” E.S. Hedley Bull, The Anarchical Society Sources of order: Units, structure, society and structure, society Bull’s argument: International politics is increasingly marked by not only structure but also by societal elements We have elements of society in anarchy, they play an important role in world politics Grotian: System and Society States: self-interest, morality and restraint, combination Soft realist Hobbesian System States entirely self-interested Hard realist Kantian Society (world) Morality alone dominates Liberal
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b. Presuppositions (3) (required to create society) Stable balance of power Without stable BoP, societal elements do not provide much restraint Great powers are status quo in character If one of the major states is revisionist, then we would not see societal elements having much effect in restraining the states Must be standard of civilization in common between states in system SYSTEM DOES NOT EQUAL SOCIETY Members of society are states Society of states not equal to world society Individuals and non-state groups also part II. Sovereignty a. Two faces of Sovereignty External face: Recognition to the outside world Internal: Authority within nation b. Exclusivity, Equality and Non-intervention Unless you are a state, you cannot have sovereignty Reflected in key distinction between “to treat” and “to contract” Anyone can contract with one another, only states can treat with one another “to treat” to negotiate a treaty To say that two states are equal as sovereigns are not to say that they are equal in power Pure equality not measure of capacity to do anything
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Non-intervention: We recognize a government as a sovereign of a particular territory We eschew the right of intervention Not appropriate for another sovereign to intervene in a sovereigns territorial affairs
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course INT POL AS.190.213 taught by Professor Danieldeudney during the Fall '11 term at Johns Hopkins.

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Lecture 14 - :Sovereignty,Diplomacy AndInternationalLaw...

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