Chapter 11 - 11 Emotion & Motivation We tend to do our...

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We tend to do our best when we experience an intermediate level of arousal (Yerkes- Dodson Law) Discrete Emotion Theory Human beings experience a small number of distinct emotions that are rooted in our biology Primary emotions – small # of emotions believed by some theorists to be cross-culturally universal Secondary emotions – emotion blends of primary emotions (pride = happiness plus?) Evidence: o Universal facial expressions (anger, fear, disgust, sadness, surprise, happiness, contempt) o Cultural differences in facial expressions explained by display rules o Differences in brain activation for fear, disgust, and anger o Differences in physiological responses Happiness Not more likely to have positive events Money doesn’t make you happy Exercise (physiological?) Connection to others (marriage, friendships, gratitude, giving) Emotion Mental state or feeling associated w/ our evaluations of our experiences A complex, multicomponent episode that creates a readiness to act
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course PSYCH 111 taught by Professor Schreier during the Fall '08 term at University of Michigan.

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Chapter 11 - 11 Emotion & Motivation We tend to do our...

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