14 & 15 - Rock and Roll

14 & 15 - Rock and Roll - 14 & 15 Rock & Roll Ray...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ray Charles “I Got a Woman” (1954) adapted from church hymn, given new secular (and sacrilegious) lyrics soaring gospel vocals (shouts, falsetto, wails) “Rock and Roll” 1922: Trixie Smith “My Man Rocks me with one Steady Roll” 1951: Cleveland DJ Alan Freed uses as alternate term for R&B in part to obscure the music's racial origins 1955-1959 Loose, general term for a collection of styles Over time, it has come to symbolize a musical revolution as working-class, urban, marginalized musics went mainstream Can't identify the beginning “Like trying to point out the first drop of rain in a hurricane” not one event, not one person, not a single style Cultural Factors (some) teenager culture post-war affluence Musical Influences (some) country and western Afro-Caribbean rhythms and Mexican music gospel music big bang swing/jazz Various styles (c. 1954-1956) southern/Memphis rockabilly (Elvis Presley)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course MUSICOL 123 taught by Professor Garret during the Fall '11 term at University of Michigan.

Page1 / 4

14 & 15 - Rock and Roll - 14 & 15 Rock & Roll Ray...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online