12 - Rhythm & Blues - 12 Rhythm & Blues...

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term gradually replaces “race music” music performed by African American artists & marketed (primarily) to African American consumers 1949: term adopted by Billboard magazine southern black, rural musical traditions shaped by the experience of urban migration (Chicago, Detroit, etc) encapsulated a variety of post-war styles blues crooners gospel-influenced vocal harmony groups swing-influenced “jump blues” urban blues and more growing presence of Black Music on the Radio jukebox culture independent record labels appeals to marginalized markets ignored by major labels Jump Blues hard-swinging dance band small combos (like a pared down swing band) oriented aaround the blues & boogie-woogie (swinging, uptempo, blues-based piano style) style Louis Jordan (1908-1975) jump bluesman extraordinaire
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course MUSICOL 123 taught by Professor Garret during the Fall '11 term at University of Michigan.

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12 - Rhythm & Blues - 12 Rhythm & Blues...

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