10 - Swing - 10 Swing peak popularity of jazz(mid-1930s to...

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10 - Swing peak popularity of jazz (mid-1930s to mid-1940s) musical origins racial dynamics Origins pioneered by black bands (Henderson, Ellington) later adopted by white bands (Goodman, Miller) uptempo, highly syncopated, riff-oriented dance music propulsive rhythm (“swing”) Fletcher Henderson (1897-1952) pianist, bandleader, arrange worded for W.C. Handy “Wrappin' It Up” (1934) uptempo, riff-based, arranged dance music with some room for solo improvisation Duke Ellington (1899-1974) pianist prolific composer (1000+ works) bandleader at the Cotton Club (1927-1932) floor shows “It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)” (1932) growling brass, riff-based, instrumental solos Swing Music Characteristics big bands/large ensembles (12-16 members) trumpets, trombones, saxophones/clarinets rhythm section vocalist written arrangements with solo improvisation call-response between sections
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course MUSICOL 123 taught by Professor Garret during the Fall '11 term at University of Michigan.

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10 - Swing - 10 Swing peak popularity of jazz(mid-1930s to...

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