E206 - MAPUAINSTITUTEOFTECHNOLOGY DepartmentofPhysics...

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                MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY                          Department of Physics E206: Archimedes’  Principle PURUGGANAN, Alvin C. 2008161038 BSCE-2 Group 1 PHY11L-B2
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December 09, 2009 Remarks and Conclusion a. Related Literature Archimedes (c. 287-212 BC) is considered as one of the greatest mathematicians and  inventors of all time.  Archimedes was born in Syracuse, Sicily. He lived there most of his life. When the Romans  attacked Syracuse, Archimedes invented weapons to defend the city. He is said to have  suggested a method of employing mirrors to set enemy ships afire. After a two-year siege  the Romans finally entered the city, and Archimedes was killed in the battle that followed.  Among his other important inventions: the lever, the compound pulley and  Archimedes’   screw But his greatest fame lies in the field of mathematics. Archimedes was able to apply  the  method of exhaustion , which is the early form of integration, by which he calculated  different areas and volumes of geometric shapes and solids. Archimedes also gave an  accurate   approximation   to     and   showed   that   he   could   approximate   square   roots π   accurately. He invented a system for expressing large numbers. In mechanics Archimedes discovered fundamental theorems  concerning the centre of gravity of plane figures and solids. His  most famous theorem gives the weight of a body immersed in  a liquid, called after him, Archimedes' principle - that a body  immersed in a fluid is subject to an upward force (buoyancy)  equal in magnitude to the weight of fluid it displaces.  Legend   says   that   Archimedes   discovered   the   principle   of  displacement while stepping into a full bath. He realized that  the water that ran over equaled in volume the submerged part of his body. Through further  experiments, he deduced the above mentioned Archimedes' principle.  The legends goes further and tells that Archimedes was so excited with his discovery that  he hopped out of the bath, and rushed naked into the street yelling triumphantly, "Eureka!"  "Eureka!" (Greek word for 'I have found it!). 
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Another legend describes how Archimedes uncovered  a fraud against King Hieron II of Syracuse using his  principle of buoyancy. The king suspected that a solid  gold   crown   he   ordered   was   partly   made   of   silver.  Archimedes took two pieces of pure gold and of pure  silver that had weights identical to the weight of the  crown. He then successively immerses the gold, the silver, and the crown in a container  filled to the brim with water and measured the volume of water that overflowed with each 
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E206 - MAPUAINSTITUTEOFTECHNOLOGY DepartmentofPhysics...

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