SOC+344+FAMILIES+and+the+ECONOMY-1

SOC+344+FAMILIES+and+the+ECONOMY-1 - Soc 344 THE ECONOMY,...

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Soc 344 THE ECONOMY, WORK, and the FAMILY
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FAMILIES and the ECONOMY
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WORK and the ECONOMY The institution of work and the economy is perhaps the most fundamental in creating and maintaining inequalities. Changes in the economy have greater impact on all other social institutions, particularly the family. These changes affect people in unequal ways ; it privilege some and oppress others. It may also provide opportunities for social change.
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Distribution of Income in the United States Mean Household Income : $145,970 66,839 42,629 25,468 10,136
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Median Income, U.S. Families, 1950-2001
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Distribution of Wealth in the United States
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POVERTY
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Poverty Absolute poverty is not having enough money to afford the most basic necessities of life, such as food, clothing, and shelter. Relative poverty is the inability to maintain an average standard of living. The poverty line is the minimum level of income that the government considers necessary for individuals’ and families’ basic subsistence.
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The 2009 Poverty Guidelines for the 48 Contiguous States and the District of Columbia Persons in family Poverty guideline 1 $10,830 2 14,570 3 18,310 4 22,050 5 25,790 6 29,530 7 33,270 8 37,010 For families with more than 8 persons, add $3,740 for each additional person.
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EXTENT OF POVERTY IN AMERICA Poor: In 2009, 14.3 percent of all persons lived in poverty. In 1993 the poverty rate was 15.1 percent. Between 1993 and 2000, the poverty rate fell each year, reaching 11.3 percent in 2000. Near Poor: 12.3 million are near poor at 125% of poverty threshold Age In 2000, 16.2% of all children were poor, contributing to high infant mortality rate
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Children represent a disproportionate share of the poor in the United States ; they are 25 percent of the total population, but 35 percent of the poor population. In 2008, 15.45 million children, or 20.7 percent, were poor. The poverty rate for children also varies substantially by race and Hispanic origin, as shown in the table below Children Under 18 Living in Poverty, 2008 Category Number (in thousands) Percent All children under 18 15, 451 20.7 White only, non-Hispanic 4, 850 11.9 Black 4,480 35.4 Hispanic 5,610 33.1 Asian 531 13.3
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Gender The feminization of poverty: 60% of poor are women Rise in households headed by single women Poverty rates are highest for families headed by single women , particularly if they are black or Hispanic. In 2009, 29.9 percent of households headed by single women were poor, while 16.9 percent of households headed by single men and 5.8 percent of married-couple households lived in poverty.
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Race and ethnicity: Two-thirds of all poor are white
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course SOCIOLOGY 344 taught by Professor Luissfeir-yunis during the Fall '11 term at University of Michigan.

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SOC+344+FAMILIES+and+the+ECONOMY-1 - Soc 344 THE ECONOMY,...

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