SOC+344+PERSPECTIVES+F+11 - SOC 344 PERSPECTIVES ON THE...

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PERSPECTIVES ON THE FAMILY SOC 344
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Even though Americans place a high value on marriage and family, a number of writers worry that the family is falling apart. Many claim that historical, demographic, economic, and cultural conditions, a weakened morality, and discrimination has been eroding the foundations of the family as an institution. Children are seriously affected by the breakdown of the family. INTRODUCTION
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Importance of Family Americans rank their family, as the most important aspect of their life , above health, work, money, and even religion(Gallup Poll, 2003) Among high school seniors , 82% of girls and 70% of boys said that having a good marriage and family was “extremely important.” (The State of our Unions, 2007) Almost 77% of first-year college students (both males and females) say that raising a family is “very important” in their lives (Chronicle of Higher Education, 2008)
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Marriage Well-being Linda Waite Married men and women do better than other groupings in terms of income, happiness, health, job satisfaction, career benefits, and domestic violence. The benefits of marriage have not declined over time.
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THE DATA
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Singles and Cohabitants SINGLES: Singles make up one of the fastest-growing groups. COHABITANTS: The number of cohabitants has climbed since 1970 and is expected to continue growing. LIVING ALONE: The percentage of people living alone has grown considerably since 1970.
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Marriage–Divorce–Remarriage DIVORCE: The number of divorces has increased over the years, until 2000 when it reached a plateau and started to decrease. One out of every two first marriages is expected to end in divorce. REMARRIAGE: Stepfamilies are becoming much more common. About 17 percent of all children live in a stepfamily.
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One-Parent Families The number of children living with one parent has also increased. The number of one-parent families has almost tripled, from 9 percent in 1960 to nearly 32 percent in 2000. Of all one-parent families, 83 percent are mother–child families. The proportion of children living with a never-married parent has also increased, from 4 percent in 1960 to 42 percent in 2000. The percentage of children under age 18 living in one-parent families has more than doubled during this same period.
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The increased participation of mothers in the labor force has been one of the most important changes in family roles. Two-earner couples with children under age 18 rose from 31 percent in 1976 to 70 percent in 2001. About 55 percent of all mothers with children under 1 year of age are in the labor force , down from an all-time high of 59 percent in 1998. Six out of every ten married
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course SOCIOLOGY 344 taught by Professor Luissfeir-yunis during the Fall '11 term at University of Michigan.

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SOC+344+PERSPECTIVES+F+11 - SOC 344 PERSPECTIVES ON THE...

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