{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

SOC+344+PERSPECTIVES+F+11 - SOC 344 PERSPECTIVES ON THE...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PERSPECTIVES ON THE FAMILY SOC 344
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Even though Americans place a high value on marriage and family, a number of writers worry that the family is falling apart. Many claim that historical, demographic, economic, and cultural conditions, a weakened morality, and discrimination has been eroding the foundations of the family as an institution. Children are seriously affected by the breakdown of the family. INTRODUCTION
Image of page 2
Importance of Family Americans rank their family, as the most important aspect of their life , above health, work, money, and even religion(Gallup Poll, 2003) Among high school seniors , 82% of girls and 70% of boys said that having a good marriage and family was “extremely important.” (The State of our Unions, 2007) Almost 77% of first-year college students (both males and females) say that raising a family is “very important” in their lives (Chronicle of Higher Education, 2008)
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Marriage Well-being Linda Waite Married men and women do better than other groupings in terms of income, happiness, health, job satisfaction, career benefits, and domestic violence. The benefits of marriage have not declined over time.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THE DATA
Image of page 6
Singles and Cohabitants SINGLES: Singles make up one of the fastest-growing groups. COHABITANTS: The number of cohabitants has climbed since 1970 and is expected to continue growing. LIVING ALONE: The percentage of people living alone has grown considerably since 1970.
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
Marriage–Divorce–Remarriage DIVORCE: The number of divorces has increased over the years, until 2000 when it reached a plateau and started to decrease. One out of every two first marriages is expected to end in divorce. REMARRIAGE: Stepfamilies are becoming much more common. About 17 percent of all children live in a stepfamily.
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
One-Parent Families The number of children living with one parent has also increased. The number of one-parent families has almost tripled, from 9 percent in 1960 to nearly 32 percent in 2000. Of all one-parent families, 83 percent are mother–child families. The proportion of children living with a never-married parent has also increased, from 4 percent in 1960 to 42 percent in 2000. The percentage of children under age 18 living in one-parent families has more than doubled during this same period.
Image of page 12
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
Employed Mothers The increased participation of mothers in the labor force has been one of the most important changes in family roles. Two-earner couples with children under age 18 rose from 31 percent in 1976 to 70 percent in 2001. About 55 percent of all mothers with children under 1 year of age are in the labor force , down from an all-time high of 59 percent in 1998. Six out of every ten married women with children under 6 years old are in the labor force.
Image of page 15

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
Image of page 17

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern