Fences_Essay - Prabhleen Kaur Period 4 Ms Weymouth Fences...

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Prabhleen Kaur Period 4 Ms. Weymouth March 20, 2019 Fences Essay “Peace is the beauty of life. It is sunshine. It is the smile of a child, the love of a mother, the joy of a father, the togetherness of a family. It is the advancement of man, the victory of a just cause, the triumph of truth.” This quote describes the sequence of emotions that the Maxson family lacks in August Wilson’s Fences. Throughout the story, Troy Maxson, his wife Rose Maxson, and his son Cory Maxson, have an emotionally catastrophic mentality towards another. Troy is the center of most of it, setting himself up as the protagonist. The three family members fail to communicate with each other, making their circumstances critical with one another. Lack of communication creates havoc on a family, resulting in unhealthy relationships, emotional neglect, and failure to assume one’s true identity. Lack of communication creates havoc on a family, resulting in unhealthy relationships. Troy Maxson is the father of Cory Maxson, and both have many reciprocating issues because they do not fully communicate with one another. In the book, Troy is lecturing Cory about why his job is more important than football. Cory then asks his father, “How come you ain’t never liked me?”(Wilson 37; Act One). Troy rudely blurts out “Liked you? Who the hell say I got to like you?”(Wilson 37; Act One). Troy and Cory have an unhealthy relationship because they don’t communicate, which leads to Cory’s assumption that his father doesn’t like him. Troy also responds to Cory in a way where he could think that he actually doesn’t like him. Instead of
being sympathetic towards Cory’s situation, his choice of words is brash. Troy lets his frustration get in the way of his relationship with his son. Later on in the book, Cory and Troy have an argument once again, after they start speaking to each other. Cory says, “You just a crazy old man...talking about I got the devil in me.” (Wilson 87, Act Two). He also later remarks, “I ain’t got to say excuse me to you. You don’t count around here anymore.” Cory says the first line to Troy, which is an extremely rude and disrespectful way to talk to any elderly figure, especially a parent. This also proves a lack of communication because it is obvious that Cory and Troy aren’t on great speaking terms with each other. This can be especially seen when Cory tells Troy that he doesn’t have to say “excuse me” to him, which is a sign of lack in communication. A

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