HR unit 5 GP - 1 Unit 5 Labor Relations Employee Relations...

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1 Unit 5 - Labor Relations, Employee Relations, and Global HR MGT330-1005A-06 : Human Resource Management - Jennifer Bertoldo Group Project Tamara Chubinidze Lorraine Huff Michelle Munoz Randy Torrao Kamelle Walker American InterContinental University December 11, 2010
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2 Introduction When making changes in any business, the policies and procedures that are administered must be beneficial to everyone associated within the company. Each and every decision will somehow affect every manager, supervisor, and employee. The repercussions of bad decision making can be detrimental to an organization; therefore changes must be made with the best interest of the company in mind. Scenario 1 Handling the Bargaining Process For quite some time in the United States, American workers have joined together in order to ensure that they are treated fairly. This organization is called unionizing. There are many reasons for worker to unionize and most differ from person to person (Dressler, 2008); however they feel the need to protect themselves against changes in their company equally. In turn, as a company, preparations need to be made to protect the company in union negotiations. To start the new contract process, a quick review of the current contract would be necessary to understand the group of unionized workers. All new supervisors will need to be trained on the “legal” aspects of this process (Dressler, 2008). For example, over the last few years research studies have been conducted in regards to labor laws. One study by Dr. Kate Bronfenbrenner, found that in several cases more than 50% of employers “threatened” works to reduce salaries, terminate workers and shut down operations (Murphy, 2009). Even though unions are established for the employees, employers should maintain lawful actions in both to negotiation process and their everyday contact with the workers. Since the purpose of the collective bargaining process this to negotiate “wage, hours, and work conditions”, it is wise to do so in good faith (Dressler, 2008).
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3 Good-Faith Bargaining Good–faith bargaining is when both the representative of the company and a representative of the union meet to willingly negotiate terms of the contract, but no way under this form must the parties agree. Their negotiation must fall under a good-faith process ( Good- , 2010). For example, it is against good-faith to ignore bargaining items (Dressler, 2008). This means that both parties must review vital items. Lastly, it is important for the company in the bargaining process to understand bargaining items from voluntary to mandatory. Voluntary items are those that are not either illegal or mandatory (Dessler, 2008). The process can’t be stopped for example over uniforms. Illegal items are those that by law are prohibited by law to be included in the contract. Mandatory items are ones that must be negotiated by both parties i.e. work conditions (Dessler, 2008). As the contract between the company and its employees is about to expire there needs to
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HR unit 5 GP - 1 Unit 5 Labor Relations Employee Relations...

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