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MAE142_Lecture4

MAE142_Lecture4 - Coordinate Frames Reference Frames...

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Coordinate Frames Reference Frames Coordinate Conversions WGS-84 Earth Model MAE 142 View of the ISS during Flyaround (NASA Image)
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2 MAE 142 Inertial Reference Frame “In every dynamics problem there must be an inertial reference frame, either explicitly defined, or lurking implicitly in the background.” [Etkin, B., Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight, Wiley, 1972]. Newton's laws of motion apply to the inertial reference frame. The inertial reference frame is not accelerating, but may be moving uniformly, relative to distant stars. Spacecraft control problems may use the Earth-Centered Inertial (ECI) frame. X-axis points in direction of the vernal equinox Y-axis is in the equatorial plane Z-axis lies along the Earth's rotational axis In many (low-speed) aircraft dynamics problems, any reference frame fixed to the Earth can be considered an inertial frame.
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3 MAE 142 Earth-Centered, Earth-Fixed (ECEF) Frame ECEF has its origin fixed to the center of the Earth.
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