Shaniqua Johnson's Best Practice Paper 11-8-11

Shaniqua Johnson's Best Practice Paper 11-8-11 - How does...

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How does Parental Incarceration Anger Running Head: How does Parental Incarceration affect their Offspring’s Anger? Best Practice Paper: How does Parental Incarceration affects their Offspring’s Anger? A Review of the Literature Shaniqua T. Johnson Temple University October 31, 2011 Abstract : Learning to cope with parental incarceration in adulthood is not a topic that is highly researched and talked about in society. Much of the research conducted during the 21 st century is geared towards children who suffer with parental incarceration, but what happens to those children when they grow up and enter adulthood? They still experience the same sort of shame, loneliness, and hurt that was once there during their adolescent years. The feeling of emptiness from a parent in prison is very similar to mourning the death of a parent, yet this social problem goes unaddressed in the lives of many young Americans, especially African Americans. Teaching adults who have a parent in prison to cope with their feelings is essential because it could lead to generational incarceration, substance abuse and cause their offspring to struggle with expressing and managing their anger. This review of the literature will explore effective clinical
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How does Parental Incarceration Anger interventions that teach clinicians how to asses anger in the youth. Interventions such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Choice Theory have been shown to be the most successful and beneficial interventions thus far when it comes to treating a young adult for anger management issues. Introduction: “Parental incarceration is a growing public problem with serious ramifications for our society particularly given the inter-generational occurrence of crime and incarceration” (Dallaire & Wilson, 2010). Therefore it comes to no surprise that approximately 2.2 million people are currently incarcerated in the United States, and more than half of them behind bars are parents (Dallaire & Wilson, 2010). The mental and physical suffrage that occurs during parental incarceration does not exclusively affect prisoners alone, but also their children who often experience feelings of shame, social stigma, loss of financial support and increased delinquency (Shillingford & Edwards, 2008). These groups of children are highly disadvantaged compared to their peers who do not face such complications that would prevent them from obtaining a healthy childhood or adulthood. It was discovered that males are more prone to experiencing violence compared to their female counterparts, which can directly impact their displaced anger, and aggressive behavior (Stevenson, 2002). Overall anger has become a popular issue for various homes and school settings, affecting 10% of 6-15 year olds whom seek treatment in effort to address their behaviors and emotions related to anger (Özabacı, 2011).
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How does Parental Incarceration Anger Problem Area: I had the honor of running support groups for children who suffer from parental
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course N.A N./A taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '11 term at UPenn.

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Shaniqua Johnson's Best Practice Paper 11-8-11 - How does...

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