Developing+Supporting+Material

Developing+Supporting+Material - Developing Supporting...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Developing Supporting Material How to Give Substance to the Main Idea of Your Speech
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Importance of Good Support Often, the most important element in a speech is how the topic is developed and supported Memorable examples, narratives, testimony, facts, and statistics
Background image of page 2
Use a Variety of Materials Virtually any speech you deliver will require a variety of supporting material other than your own personal opinion or experience Listeners respond most favorably to a variety of supporting materials derived from multiple sources to illustrate each main point Alternating among different types of supporting material will make the presentation more interesting and credible
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
How to Cite Sources In a Speech No set format for orally citing sources Clearly identify where your information came from and provide your listeners with enough context to accurately interpret it
Background image of page 4
Offer Examples Examples illustrate, describe, or represent things Aid understanding by making ideas, items, or events more concrete Help describe or explain things with which the audience may not be familiar Can be brief or extended and may be either factual or hypothetical
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tell Stories Can be brief and simple, or constitute most of the presentation Key is choosing a story that will strike a responsive chord with the audience
Background image of page 6
Selecting Examples or Stories Does the example or story truly illustrate or prove the point I need to make? Is it credible? Is it compelling enough? Is it suitable for my audience’s background and experiences?
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Possible Forms for Citing Narratives “In J. R. R. Tolkien’s classic trilogy The Lord of the Rings, a young Hobbit boy named Frodo…” “Some of you will recall when, in the animated movie The Incredibles, a family of superheroes — including Mr. Incredible, his wife Elastigirl, and their three kids — try to blend into the suburbs…” “I can never forget the day…” “At 9 A.M. on December 3, 2008, Shawn Bailey left her home for work…”
Background image of page 8
Draw on Testimony Quote or paraphrase people who have an intimate knowledge of your topic Firsthand findings, eyewitness accounts, and opinions by people, both lay (nonexpert) and expert
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course 192 220 taught by Professor Barris during the Fall '09 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 26

Developing+Supporting+Material - Developing Supporting...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online