lecture02 - CS 551/651 Advanced Graphics Introduction to...

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CS 551/651 Advanced Graphics Introduction to Animation Technical Background
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Principles of Computer Animation John Lasseter, "Principles of Traditional Animation Applied to 3D Computer Animation", Computer Graphics , pp. 35-44, 21 :4, July 1987 (SIGGRAPH 87). Ollie Johnston and John Lasseter, Course 1 at SIGGRAPH 94, "Animation Tricks".
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Comments from Lasseter Keyframing Computers are stupid Worst case, keyframe require for every frame John discovered that some degrees of freedom (DOFs) require more keyframes than others to look natural You must start with a clear idea of the motion you desire Plan actions with thumbnail sketches and plot timing on exposure sheet Refer to sketches/timing frequently
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Lasseter: 2-D vs. 3-D Native computer character is 3-D Sometimes makes it harder A character’s hand may go through its body when seen from a certain angle Sometimes makes it easier Animation reuse: An animation may look very different when seen from different locations
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Lasseter: Weight and Size Rendering can make realistic-looking objects (marble, feathers, steel) Good rendering benefits are lost if animation is poor Physics matters – heavy things take longer to start/stop moving… Proper timing/spacing of poses is more important than the poses themselves
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Lasseter: Weight and Size See videos on desktop
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Lasseter: Thinking Character Every motion must exist for a reason Mood Personality Attitude You must convey the character’s thoughts to tell the story Use anticipation
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Lasseter: Anticipation Lead with the eyes Move eyes first, with lock-in of focus a few frames before the head Head follows and leads the body by a few frames More delay implies more thought required Use this relationship as a tool External forces cause opposite timing relationship
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Lasseter: Moving Holds Traditional 2-D animation permits “holds” Reuse of one drawing for multiple frames This is one way to control timing In computer animation action dies immediately Perhaps due to realistic rendering and smooth animations Eye picks it up every time
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Lasseter: Moving Holds Have some part of the character continue to move in same direction during holds Remember to coordinate realism of character to realism of motions More realistic characters (rendering style and dimensions) require more realistic movements This rule limits the straightforward reuse of human facial mocap for non-human 3D characters
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Lasseter: Emotion Character’s personality conveyed through emotion Emotion dictates animation pace Distinguish emotional state of two characters through contrast in movement No two characters perform same action in same manner
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