e1.f05 - ECE 190 Exam I Fall 2005 Tuesday, September 27th,...

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ECE 190 Exam I Fall 2005 Tuesday, September 27 th , 2005 x Be sure your exam booklet has 12 pages. x Write your name at the top of each page. x This is a closed book exam. x You may not use a calculator. x You are allowed one handwritten 8.5 x 11” sheet of notes. x Absolutely no interaction between students is allowed. x Show all of your work. x Be sure to clearly indicate any assumptions that you make. x More challenging questions are marked with a ***. x Don’t panic, and good luck! “A professor is one who talks in someone else’s sleep.” – W. H. Auden Problem 1 20 points _______________________________ Problem 2 20 points _______________________________ Problem 3 20 points _______________________________ Problem 4 20 points _______________________________ Problem 5 20 points _______________________________ Total 100 points Name:
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Page 2 Name: ____________________________________________ Problem 1 (20 points): Short Answer Part A (5 points): The IR (Instruction Register) holds the instruction that is to be executed. Given that the instruction bits can be held in the MDR, why is an IR necessary? Part B (5 points): Consider the following LC-3 instruction (x3500 is the address at which the instruction is located): x3500 LD R5, _____ ; we want to put the value x2BFF in register R5 Given the above instruction, what is the range of memory addresses at which the value x2BFF can be stored such that the above instruction can be executed successfully? Part C (5 points): A certain memory chip has a total of 2 32 bits and is 8-bit addressable. How many address bits must be specified when reading or writing a location on this chip? Part D (5 points): What fraction of the range of numbers that can be represented with an N-bit 2’s complement data type can also be represented with an (N+1)-bit unsigned data type? (Justify your answer.)
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Page 3 Name: ____________________________________________ Problem 2 (20 Points): Representations Part A (7 points): Your friend complains to you that the number 1,073,741,825 (in hexadecimal, x40000001) cannot be represented using an IEEE single-precision floating point representation (1-bit sign, 8-bit exponent, 23-bit mantissa). Is your friend right? If so, why would one ever use floating point, given that 32-bit 2’s complement can
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course ECE 190 taught by Professor Hutchinson during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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e1.f05 - ECE 190 Exam I Fall 2005 Tuesday, September 27th,...

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