17_tides_B - Tides II GS222 Lecture 17 Overview - this...

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Unformatted text preview: Tides II GS222 Lecture 17 Overview - this lecture Clarification of first tides lecture Review dynamic tide theory Spring & Neap tides Amphidromic systems Distribution of centripetal force Each particle on earth moves around the center of mass (CM) in circles of same diameter, in same amount of time each particle requires same centripetal force Clarification of text Text confuses pressure gradient with tide-generating force Ignore Segar on this point! Key is that imbalance of centripetal force and gravity at given points cause water to flow creating bulges Dynamic theory of the tides Assume tides are moving rather than the earth moving through tidal bulges. 1) Tide waves run into continents Waves reflect (bounce-off), disperse (weaken), and refract As a result, tidal waves behave differently in different ocean basin geometries 2) Tide waves are shallow water waves Average ocean water depth (4 km) is << L/20, where L is ~ circumference of the earth Dynamic theory of the tides 3) Tides move slower than earths rotational velocity at most latitudes, so tidal wave falls behind the earth 4) Coriolis effect alters path of tidal wave- water in tidal wave moves in very flattened elliptical orbits (shallow water waves!)- orbits are so flat they are essentially horizontal (and L is very long)- therefore water moving with a tide wave is subject to Coriolis effect Amphidromic systems...
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course GEO 222 taught by Professor Davidlund during the Winter '11 term at University of Michigan.

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17_tides_B - Tides II GS222 Lecture 17 Overview - this...

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