Tutorial-Highlighted-Day1

Tutorial-Highlighted-Day1 - A Practical Guide To Building...

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Unformatted text preview: A Practical Guide To Building OWL Ontologies Using Prot´ eg´ e 4 and CO-ODE Tools Edition 1.2 Matthew Horridge Contributors v 1.0 - Holger Knublauch , Alan Rector , Robert Stevens , Chris Wroe v 1.1 - Simon Jupp, Georgina Moulton, Robert Stevens v 1.2 - Nick Drummond, Simon Jupp, Georgina Moulton, Robert Stevens The University Of Manchester Copyright c The University Of Manchester March 13, 2009 Chapter 1 Introduction This guide introduces Prot´ eg´ e 4 for creating OWL ontologies. Chapter 3 gives a brief overview of the OWL ontology language. Chapter 4 focuses on building an OWL-DL ontology and using a Description Logic Reasoner to check the consistency of the ontology and automatically compute the ontology class hierarchy. Chapter 7 describes some OWL constructs such as hasValue Restrictions and Enumerated classes, which aren’t directly used in the main tutorial. 1.1 Conventions Class, property and individual names are written in a sans serif font like this . Names for user interface views are presented in a style ‘ like this ’. Where exercises require information to be typed into Prot´ eg´ e 4 a type writer font is used like this . Exercises and required tutorial steps are presented like this: Exercise 1: Accomplish this 1. Do this. 2. Then do this. 3. Then do this. 7 Tips and suggestions related to using Prot´ eg´ e 4 and building ontologies are pre- sented like this. Explanation as to what things mean are presented like this. Potential pitfalls and warnings are presented like this. General notes are presented like this. Vocabulary explanations and alternative names are presented like this. 8 Chapter 3 What are OWL Ontologies? Ontologies are used to capture knowledge about some domain of interest. An ontology describes the concepts in the domain and also the relationships that hold between those concepts. Different ontology languages provide different facilities. The most recent development in standard ontology languages is OWL from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) 1 . Like Prot´ eg´ e , OWL makes it possible to describe concepts but it also provides new facilities. It has a richer set of operators - e.g. intersection, union and negation. It is based on a different logical model which makes it possible for concepts to be defined as well as described. Complex concepts can therefore be built up in definitions out of simpler concepts. Furthermore, the logical model allows the use of a reasoner which can check whether or not all of the statements and definitions in the ontology are mutually consistent and can also recognise which concepts fit under which definitions. The reasoner can therefore help to maintain the hierarchy correctly. This is particularly useful when dealing with cases where classes can have more than one parent....
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course CS 2984 taught by Professor Lewis during the Spring '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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Tutorial-Highlighted-Day1 - A Practical Guide To Building...

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