lec13 - CS 6093 Lecture 13 Spring 2011 Human Computation...

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CS 6093 Lecture 13 Spring 2011 Human Computation Cong Yu 05/02/2011
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Announcements Project presentation and demo – Deadline: email us your slides by 4pm ET on the day of the lecture. – Format: pdf or ppt. Be aware that we use Mac, fancy animations created on Windows may not work well. Find a Mac and check the slides out before emailing us. – Length: prepare 25 minutes + 5 minutes for Q/A This means roughly 30 slides – Participation: we expect you to ask constructive and critical thinking questions about other groups’ projects. – Ping us if you have any question. Quizzes: – Quizzes on data mining have been graded, please pick up at the end of the class. Final report: – Due at noon ET, Friday the 13 th of May (hmm … don’t rely on luck!)
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Today’s Outline Introduction Human Computation: CAPTCHA, Peekaboom, etc. Crowdsourcing and Database Research Basic Concepts in Social Community Analysis Conclusion
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We are not there … (yet)
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There are (still) things only human can do
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Many computational tasks are done with human in the loop since long long ago Machine learning: manual efforts are required to generate training examples to build a machine model Information retrieval: people need to participate in user studies for the system designers to be able to evaluate different interaction flows and interfaces And more …
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So, what’s all the fuss? The Web (what else?) The Web enabled people to connect virtually and brought in two main advantages that were previously impossible. – Any guess? Scalability – 10 users vs 10,000 workers Cost effectiveness – $10+/hour vs $0.01/task It’s now possible to design a task and have thousands of people working on it cheaply at a moment’s notice!
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Crowdsourcing Story NIH wants to do an exhibition about pandemics and needs photos about people getting immunized, sneezing, etc. Traditional stock photos created by professional photographers – $100-$150/photo (that’s at a discounted non-profit rate!) iStockphoto – 22,000+ amateur photographers – $1/photo! This is a trend happening everywhere!
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Crowdsourcing vs. Human Computation Crowdsourcing – A business concept, evolved from outsourcing • “The Rise of Crowdsourcing,” by Jeff Howe, Wired, June 2006. – Open call for problem workers through the open Web or crowdsourcing platforms – Workers are paid cheaply or even work voluntary – Good solutions often percolate up, through the wisdom of crowds – E.g., Wikipedia Human Computation – A more scientific concept, opposite to machine computation – Leverage human intelligence to solve hard AI problems • Users get rewarded through enjoyment – E.g., reCAPTCHA
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Introduction Human Computation: CAPTCHA, Peekaboom, etc. Crowdsourcing and Database Research
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This note was uploaded on 01/22/2012 for the course CS 6093 taught by Professor Diaz during the Spring '11 term at NYU Poly.

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lec13 - CS 6093 Lecture 13 Spring 2011 Human Computation...

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