ENG 203_4B

ENG 203_4B - ENG 203:SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE System Engineering...

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ENG 203:SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE 01/20/12 1 System Engineering in an Acquisition Context John M. Borky 2009 - all rights reserved Engineering 203 System Architecture Dr. Mike Borky mborky@aol.com (Cell) 505 453-0496 © John M. Borky 2009 – all rights reserved
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ENG 203:SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE 01/20/12 2 Session 4 – Logical View Lectures: 4A – From Requirements to Design 4B – Structural Perspective 4C – Behavioral Perspective 4D – Data and Services Perspectives John M. Borky 2009 - all rights reserved
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ENG 203:SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE 01/20/12 3 Lecture 4B – Implementing Domains in an Object-Oriented Design John M. Borky 2009 - all rights reserved
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ENG 203:SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE 01/20/12 4 Discovering Classes/Objects (1) The first step in structural design is to decompose OV Domains to a level commensurate with real hardware and software components: For a complex system two or more levels of decomposition are typically required: Subdomains, or equivalently Subsystems, that contain the resources performing a major role or group of functions of the Domain Collaborations of Classes that implement each Subdomain/Subsystem This is prime territory for applying design patterns Judgment is required in deciding how and how far to decompose the structure – typical Classes represent clearly identifiable hardware and software components and can be further decomposed, e.g. with Classes defined in OO programming languages Very careful attention to interfaces is crucial Must account for all required system elements, e.g. the E-X example in the preceding lecture: Mission Equipment – sensors, communications devices, navigation systems, etc. Platform Interfaces – power and cooling sources, information exchanges, etc. Mission Computing – hardware, software, human-system interfaces (HSI), etc. Anything else the system requires John M. Borky 2009 - all rights reserved
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ENG 203:SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE 01/20/12 5 Discovering Classes/Objects (2) The Structural Perspective is likely to be iterated and refined, especially on the basis of behavioral modeling, to deal with problems like: Partitioning that requires extensive interactions across Subdomain/
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course ENGR 203 taught by Professor Borky during the Summer '10 term at UCLA.

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ENG 203_4B - ENG 203:SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE System Engineering...

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