Chapter 13

Chapter 13 - 13-1 Chapter 13 Architecting the Enterprise John M BorkyCopyright 2009-2010 All rights reserved No portion of this document may be

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Unformatted text preview: 13-1 Chapter 13. Architecting the Enterprise John M. BorkyCopyright 2009-2010. All rights reserved. No portion of this document may be reproduced or distributed without the consent of the author.13-2 Chapter 13. Architecting the Enterprise “Small opportunities are often the beginning of great enterprises.” Demosthenes “Make no small plans . . .” David Burnham Enterprise Architecture In Chapter 1, we introduced an Axis of Organization with an overarching Enterprise level of organization at the top. Organizations from the worlds of industry, commerce, academia and Government have progressively exploited the growing power and availabil-ity of the Internet and private networks to connect locations, systems, and users, often widely separated, in ways that improve the capability, speed, efficiency and accuracy of their operations. Indeed, the term Enterprise Architecture (EA) has come to mean much more than the technical topics of this book and now embraces everything from organiza-tions, business processes and policies to socio-economic factors and corporate culture. The Enterprise Architect is becoming recognized as a spet who has the broad tech-nical and organizational skills to deal with the many dimensions of EA. Before undertak-ing a discussion of applying MBSAP at the level of an enterprise, we should introduce the subject in this broader context. The Institute for Enterprise Architecture Developments (IFEAD), an international or-ganization that is one of many that seek to standardize and improve EA practice, offers a fairly typical definition of EA as:1. . . a complete expression of the enterprise; a master plan which “acts as a collabo-ration force” between aspects of business planning such as goals, visions, strategies and governance principles; aspects of business operations such as business terms, organization structures, processes and data; aspects of automation such as informa-tion systems and databases; and the enabling technological infrastructure of the business such as computers, operating systems and networks. The organization approaches EA in terms of People, Business Objectives, Processes and Technology, to which might be added Data, Organization, and other dimensions. Organi-zational and staff development, strategic planning, process distribution and synchroniza-tion, organizational metrics, and many other matters of concern to senior management can and do become part of an EA project. The IFEAD Web site offers a rich assortment of standards and source materials. We will confine ourselves mostly to the technical aspects of EA. Figure 13-1 sketches a very simple notional industrial enterprise in which a company headquarters, an engi-neering center, a factory, and a warehouse are networked together. This allows projects, orders, material management, shipping, and other activities to be centrally managed, im-plemented through workflows, and supported with information exchanges. Many real world enterprises look something like this and have common needs and issues. Since world enterprises look something like this and have common needs and issues....
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2012 for the course ENGR 203 taught by Professor Borky during the Summer '10 term at UCLA.

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Chapter 13 - 13-1 Chapter 13 Architecting the Enterprise John M BorkyCopyright 2009-2010 All rights reserved No portion of this document may be

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