Ecology Biogeochemical Cycles

Ecology Biogeochemical Cycles - Biogeochemical Cycles...

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Biogeochemical Cycles Ecosystems need both energy and nutrients . Element or nutrient cycles behave differently from energy flow.
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Biogeochemical Cycles Biomass and chemical energy are dissipated as they move through an ecosystem. Nutrients are conserved and continuously recycled.
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Biogeochemical Cycles The most important and frequently studied cycles are those of carbon , nitrogen , phosphorus and water since they are essential and limiting to NP in most ecosystems.
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Biogeochemical Cycles Because biological, chemical, atmospheric and geological processes are all involved we use the term biogeochemical cycles but the shorthand is “nutrient cycle.”
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Gaseous versus Sedimentary Cycles We can broadly classify cycles by the dominant source of the element. Phosphorus and calcium are found primarily in sediments (soil, rocks, etc.). These are sedimentary cycles.
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Gaseous versus Sedimentary Cycles The dominant source of nitrogen is in the atmosphere. This is a gaseous cycle.
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Perfect versus Imperfect Cycles More important is whether a cycle has an atmospheric reservoir readily available to ecosystems. If so, such a cycle is called a “ perfect cycle, since these nutrients are not “lost” for long periods of time.
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Perfect versus Imperfect Cycles Examples of perfect cycles: Nitrogen Oxygen Carbon Dioxide Sulfur Water
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Perfect versus Imperfect Cycles Those cycles that lack an atmospheric stage are purely sedimentary . In sedimentary cycles, nutrients can become fixed in rocks or sediments at the bottom of the ocean.
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Perfect versus Imperfect Cycles They are potentially lost to ecosystems for long periods of time. Hence, these are “ imperfect ” cycles. Examples: Phosphorous Magnesium Iron Calcium Potassium
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Perfect versus Imperfect Cycles Some cycles, such as carbon and sulfur , are hybrids , and have both sedimentary and atmospheric components to their cycles. But they both still function as “ perfect cycles.
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Biogeochemical Processes 1. Release from rocks through weathering. 2. Loss of nutrients to aquatic ecosystems through leaching.
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Biogeochemical Processes 3. Recirculation of nutrients through terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.
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Biogeochemical Processes 4. Release to atmosphere and fixation or return from the atmosphere. 5. Loss for long periods as ocean sediments.
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Biogeochemical Cycles Man has had significant effects on the following global biogeochemical cycles. 1. Carbon (Carbon Dioxide) 2. Nitrogen 3. Sulfur Pollution and changes in land use and cover, have had major effects on biogeochemical cycles.
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Nitrogen Cycle The global nitrogen cycle is unique in that it consists of: 1. A large well-mixed pool of N 2 in the atmosphere; 2. A smaller quantity of nitrogen bonded to carbon, oxygen and/or hydrogen that cycles among plants, animals, soils, sediments, and solutions; and
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Nitrogen Cycle 3. A set of relatively small, largely
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Ecology Biogeochemical Cycles - Biogeochemical Cycles...

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