Ecology Predator-Prey

Ecology Predator-Prey -...

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Summary: Interspecific Interactions among Populations -/- Competition: a reciprocally negative   interaction +/+ Mutualism: Both Species Benefit +/0 Commensalism: One species is not  affected; the other species benefits +/- One species benefits and the other  species is harmed. Predator/prey; Parasite/Host;  Herbivore/Plant
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Interspecific Interactions among Populations Terminology: Symbiosis:  An intimate  associate between  different species, often  the result of co-evolution.   A symbiotic relationship  can be positive, negative  or  commensal .
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Interspecific Interactions among Populations Facultative : A relationship between two  species that is not required for the  survival of the species.   mutualist  may survive without its  partner;  parasite  may have many different  hosts.
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Interspecific Interactions among Populations Obligatory : The interaction  between the two species is  required for the survival of  one or both species.   Examples: Specialized  pollinators, host-specific  parasites, mutualisms in  which a species cannot  survive on its own.
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Predator/Prey, Parasite/Host, Herbivore/Plant Interactions These interactions are fundamental at  the  population community  and  ecosystem  levels of organization. 1. At the  population   level, predators,  herbivores and parasites can regulate  the population of the lower trophic level.
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Predator/Prey, Parasite/Host, Herbivore/Plant Interactions 2. At the  community  level, such  interactions may drive some species  extinct and change the community. Or predators, parasites and herbivores  can allow coexistence of more species  in the community.
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Predator/Prey, Parasite/Host, Herbivore/Plant Interactions 3. At the  ecosystem   level, such  interactions provide a  means of energy flow   from one trophic  level to another.
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Predator/Prey, Parasite/Host, Herbivore/Plant Interactions Carnivores : Kill  living prey and  consume them  immediately.
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Predator/Prey, Parasite/Host, Herbivore/Plant Interactions Parasitoids : Do not  immediately kill their  hosts.  The host is stung  and paralyzed.  The  parasitoid (usually a type  of wasp) lays an egg  which hatches into a  larva.  The larva then  slowly consumes the host  as it matures.  The host  eventually dies.
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Herbivore/Plant Interactions Parasites   do not usually  kill their hosts.  They  harvest energy over long  period of time and  reproduce copiously. The picture to the right 
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course BIOL/EVPP 307 taught by Professor Crerar during the Summer '11 term at George Mason.

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Ecology Predator-Prey -...

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