Final Review - Freshwater Ecosystems The Season Finale...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Freshwater Ecosystems – The Season Finale EVPP/BIOL 350 Freshwater Ecosystems
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Physical and Chemical Aspects of Freshwater Ecosystems
Background image of page 2
The Global Hydrologic Cycle
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fate of Precipitation in a Watershed 1. Interception 2. Depression Storage 3. Infiltration 4. Surface Runoff 5. Interflow 6. Groundwater 7. Streamflow 7A. Baseflow 7B. Stormflow
Background image of page 4
www.aquatic.uoguelph.ca/rivers/chphys.htm Hydrographs
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Wetlands: Regulatory Definition Those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions . Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs and fens. Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE) Wetland Delineation Manual Para 26a
Background image of page 6
Properties of Water 1. Molecular Structure 2. Liquid Nature of Water 3. Specific Heat 4. Density vs. Temperature 5. Solvent Properties 6. Viscosity 7. Surface Tension
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Density by Temperature Density is defined as the weight or mass of a substance per unit volume (g/cm3) The density of water varies in an interesting way with temperature The first thing to notice is that ice is a lot lighter than liquid water This is a good thing because it mean ice floats on water and is much more easily thawed in spring
Background image of page 8
Light Attenuation Attenuation Mathematical statement of Beer-Lambert- Bouguer Law I(z) = I(0) * e-kz where I(z) is Irradiance (light) at depth z I(0) is Irradiance (light) at the surface minus reflection k is the coefficient of attenuation The rate of light attenuation for each unit of depth is e-k Leads to an exponential decrease in light with
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Light in Lakes Light attenuation in lakes is also approximated by determining Secchi disc depth, zSD Secchi disc depth has been shown to be related inversely to light attenuation coefficient One equation commonly used is: K = 1.7/zSD
Background image of page 10
Light in Lakes Photic zone Lower limit defined by 1% of surface light Depth at which I(z)/I(0) = 0.01 zPZ = - ln 0.01 / k zPZ = 2.7 zSD
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stratification Stable stratification results when waters of differing densities are positioned vertically in order of their density In other words, more density (heavier) water lies below less dense (lighter) water Work is required to break down this density gradient
Background image of page 12
Annual Mixing Patterns Mixing occurs when the density of the water body becomes uniform or nearly uniform with depth Dimictic - Stratification twice a year (and thus mixing in between) Monomictic Stratification only in summer (mild climates) Polymictic Frequent mixing (shallow lakes) Amictic If the water body never mixes (permanent ice cover)
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“Idealized” Stratification Curves Unproductive P r o d u c t i v e
Background image of page 14
Phosphorus Phosphorus is the limiting nutrient in lakes Phosphorus is an important nutrient in wetlands, and in some freshwater wetlands the limiting nutrient (like lakes)
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 76

Final Review - Freshwater Ecosystems The Season Finale...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online