Larger Organisms - B

Larger Organisms - B - Lecture 11B Larger Organisms...

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Lecture 11B Larger Organisms EVPP/BIOL 350 Freshwater Ecosystems Dr. Kim de Mutsert
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Fishes of Tidal Freshwater Freshwater Bluegill Largemouth bass Yellow perch catfish
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Fishes of Tidal Freshwater Estuarine and/or Anadromous Striped bass White perch American Shad Killifish Bay anchovy Hogchoker Silverside
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Fishes of Tidal Freshwater Rozas and Odum (1987) did a study of invertebrates and fish in the tidal Chickahominy near Richmond They found a mixture of freshwater and brackish water species Note the high abundance of forage species, food for larger fish A m e r i c a n e e l ( 7 0 ) B
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Fishes of Tidal Freshwater Rozas and Odum (1987) Note the seasonal changes in the dominant species Banded killfish appeared early and then dropped off Spotted sunfish gradually increased, perhaps as SAV cover developed, then left late in the season Grass shrimp were only found in the later half of the season, perhaps as the water became slightly
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Fishes of Tidal Freshwater Rozas and Odum (1987) Note also the effect of vegetation on these small forage species They obviously cluster in the vegetated areas where they are somewhat protected from predation
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American Shad Native to western Atlantic coast from St. Lawrence River to Florida Anadromous species: spends most of its life at sea in large schools During average life span of 5 years at sea may migrate over 20,000 km Enters freshwater in the spring to spawn Uses tidal freshwater directly and consumes prey that are produced in tidal freshwater marshes Provides a link between tidal freshwater marshes, estuarine waters and the ocean
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Spawning occurs in both tidal and nontidal waters from late March to early June Spawning may occur many miles above the head of tide A single female can produce as many as
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course BIOL/EVPP 350 taught by Professor Kimdemutsert during the Fall '11 term at George Mason.

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Larger Organisms - B - Lecture 11B Larger Organisms...

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