Prokaryotes & Protists

Prokaryotes & Protists - Lecture 9. Diversity of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 9. Diversity of Aquatic Organisms: Prokaryotes and Protists EVPP/BIOL 350 Dr. Kim de Mutsert
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prokaryotes Distinguished from eukaryotes by their lack of intracellular organelles Genetic material not enclosed in a nuclear membrane (there is no nucleus) Presence of macromolecules distinctly different from those of eukaryotes
Background image of page 2
Prokaryotes Two of three domains are prokaryotes: Bacteria and Archaea All other organisms are in the third domain: Eukaryota Archaea and Bacteria are very different in details of genetics Archaea cell walls lack peptidoglycan; a complex polymer bacteria cell walls are made of
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prokaryote structure Typically 0.1-2.0 μm long Largest surface-to- volume ratio of living organisms Flagella can be present: used for movement by rotating the flagellum like a corkscrew Individual bacteria can attach to eachother to form large filaments or masses, e.g.
Background image of page 4
Prokaryote habitat Everywhere In freshwater habitats: in open water and on or in other organisms Archaea are abundant in extreme habitats: Extremophiles Hydrothermal vent
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prokaryote behavior Some bacteria can swim towards or away from a stimulus (using flagella) Directed movement could be toward light or food or away from a toxic chemical Turning frequency increases when the organism no longer detects a stimulus: random walk
Background image of page 6
Prokaryote energy uptake Heterotrophs: require energy in the form of organic molecules (taken up through the cell wall) Autotrophs: Use CO2 as carbon source - Photoautotrophs Use light energy to drive the synthesis of organic compounds from carbon dioxide - Chemoautotrophs Oxidize inorganic compounds such as hydrogen sulfide or ammonia to obtain energy (and CO2 as carbon source)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Eukaryota Have organelles within the cells Evolved as a result of endosymbiotic relationship among prokaryotes: organelles are remnants of parasitic bacteria within a large prokaryote Classified into four kingdoms: plants, animals, fungi, and protists (one-celled organisms)
Background image of page 8
Eukaryota
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Protista Protozoa: animal-like protists Algae: photosynthetic protists Can live as single cells or form colonies Free floating (e.g. phytoplankton) or attached to surfaces Often form biofilms or aufwuchs with other organisms
Background image of page 10
Major groups of protists Ciliophora Cilia used for movement and feeding Protozoa
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Major groups of protists Rhizopoda Include amoebes Protozoa
Background image of page 12
Actinopoda Protozoa
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 40

Prokaryotes & Protists - Lecture 9. Diversity of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online