Wetland Management & Restoration

Wetland Management & Restoration - Lecture 21...

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Lecture 21 – Wetland Management and Restoration EVPP/BIOL 350
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Monitoring Watershed Recovery Until recovery trends are manifested in some self-sustaining, relatively naturally functioning condition, restoration or recovery has not truly occurred When resources committed to monitoring and evaluating are insufficient, new projects fail to receive the potential benefit of knowledge gained from adequate analysis of past mistakes and successes
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Watershed-Scale Restoration – Case Study The watershed-scale restoration project at Redwood Creek Basin, Redwood National Park, California
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Redwood Creek Basin The restoration program did not begin as an effort focused on fish, but had the broader goal to restore natural watershed and stream channel processes Experimental efforts focused on upslope erosion sources which are the principal and continuing cause of problems in the stream channel
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Redwood Creek Basin A combination of different restoration efforts was applied It started with assessment of condition by physical as well as biological scientists to determine what was at the root of the problem Acknowledging the experimental nature, teams of physical and biological scientists designed and executed an extensive monitoring and evaluation effort
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Redwood Creek Basin Most projects were geared toward reducing potential sediment sources to streams, but there were small local projects added within the larger framework Construction and modification projects using heavy equipment and hand labor were involved If sufficient care was taken during equipment operations, park staff found they could rely largely on natural revegetation continuing the restoration
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Long-term monitoring Long-term monitoring is the most practical and effective way to assess a restoration program and document the recovery of ecosystems A reference area is important again: this time to assess the unrestored condition of a river to gauge the effect of restoration efforts on your ‘treatment’ river
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Adaptive Ecosystem Management Predicting the outcome of restoration efforts at the scale of a whole watershed is highly problematic due to the diffuse, persistent, and time-dependent nature of cumulative effects operating within a basin The best approach is to implement a sound adaptive management plan
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Volunteer opportunity: Become an Arlington Stream Monitor Training offered January 12 from 7-9 p.m.
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2012 for the course BIOL/EVPP 350 taught by Professor Kimdemutsert during the Fall '11 term at George Mason.

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Wetland Management & Restoration - Lecture 21...

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